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New Years Resolutions and Sports Injury Prevention, a Chiropractor’s perspective

New Years Resolutions and Sports Injury Prevention, a Chiropractor’s perspective The new year can often be a hectic time for Chiropractors and people working in the musculoskeletal health field. After, the typical excesses of the Christmas and New Years festivities, many people make health and fitness related new years resolutions. Evidence has suggested for a long time that activity is essential for physical and even mental health. However, unfortunately, many fitness related new years resolutions become short-lived due to injury. The full article on Sports Injury Prevention, a Chiropractor’s perspective looks at common injury mechanisms and ways to help avoid them in the first place.



Article written by Dr Terry Davis MChiro, DC, BSc (Hons), Adv. Dip. Rem. Massag.,  Cert. WHS.
TotalMSK Ltd The Corporate Wellness, Musculoskeletal and Chiropractic Specialists
www.totalmsk.co.uk







Recent posts

Tissue Healing and Scar Tissue - the relationship to Adaption and Biotensegrity - A Chiropractor's perspective

Tissue Healing and Scar Tissue - the relationship to Adaption and Biotensegrity (summary) Although many people may not realise it, injuries and tissue healing have more relevance than just at the time of injury. Injuries, tend to create pain, which in turn the affects how one moves at the time of injury. In essence, our bodies adapt to allow us to move in a way that tries to avoid pain and yet enables us to survive. Such movement adaptions become learnt at the time of injury, during the healing phase and often long after healing has finished, effectively becoming normalised. Furthermore, when soft-tissues heal the process results in scar tissue, which is very different to the original tissue. The combination of adaptions and scar tissue can create changes in loads (biotensegrity) on other structures within the body. Unresolved trauma and changes in biotensegrity can frequently lead to other seemingly unrelated injuries sometimes years later. The full article on Healing, Adaption, Biot…

Biotensegrity - Relevance to injury, treatment and training - a Chiropractor's perspective

Biotensegrity - Relevance to injury, treatment and training - a Chiropractor's perspective (summary) The human body consists of a combination of parts, structures, joints and soft-tissues, which enable us to move amongst other things. One should view the body as a single or whole structure as everything grew via mitosis (cell division). Structures and tissues within the body have different material properties such as elasticity, strength and more. Our bodies maintain and change shape through a combination of compressive and tensional forces within (Biotensegrity). Loads or forces within the body are continually changing according to the requirements placed on the body. Many people seem to forget that our limbs are relatively heavy and our bodies deal with the force of gravity 24/7. Equally, biotensegrity can change due to injuries (trauma), or tissue adaptions. The full article on Biotensegrity and its relevance - A Chiropractor's perspective explains far more.

Article written …

Tissue Adaption - relevance for injury prevention, rehabilitation and training

Tissue Adaption - relevance for injury prevention, rehabilitation and training. Tissue adaption is highly relevant to injury prevention, training, performance, injury rehabilitation and general musculoskeletal health. Tissues and structures within the body have different types of properties, based on function. The musculoskeletal system adapts to applied forces and as is tolerable. Equally, tissues and structures respond differently according to the types of force involved, speed of force, duration of force, the direction of force and more. Adaptions also have relevance for Biotensegrity and tissue healing. The full article about Tissue Adaption - A Chiropractor's perspective, contains far more detail about the process of musculoskeletal adaption.

Article written by Dr Terry Davis MChiro, DC, BSc (Hons), Adv. Dip. Rem. Massag.,  Cert. WHS.
TotalMSK Ltd The Corporate Wellness, Musculoskeletal and Chiropractic Specialists www.totalmsk.co.uk

Stress, the Individual, Wellbeing, Performance and the Workplace (Part Three)

Part three of the article on “Stress, the individual, Wellbeing, Performance and the Workplace”, is the third and final part of the three-part “stress-related” article.
Just a brief recap.  Part one looked at the physiological and psychological aspects of the “Human Stress Response” and how perception plays a large part in the stress initiation process. The “fight, flight and freeze” stress responses were also explained, along with the wide variety of physiological changes that occur throughout the entire body.
Part Two looked at the longer term effects of continually initiating the human stress response and how this interferes with the bodies day to day repair and maintenance processes. The second part of the article also looked at short and long-term physical, emotional and psychological (mental health) effects of overstimulation of the human stress response.
The final part of the article will look at effective measures that can be taken to help reduce the adverse effects of stress. As…

Shin Splints - Running Injury Series

Shin Splints are another reasonably common running injury, though the condition does not only affect runners. There are many sports and activities which involve placing a load on the lower legs and which can lead to Shin Splints. As per the name, Shin Splint pain occurs over the shin bone or Tibia area of the lower leg. The diagram below shows a lower left leg, the larger Tibia (shin bone), smaller Fibula and part of the ankle/foot complex.

Images produced with kind permission of 3d4medical.com from Essential Anatomy 5 (Copyright © 2018 3D4Medical. All rights reserved.)
The pain may appear over a small or large area of the shin. The pain can dull in nature, though more often than not is quite sharp. In some cases, people can push through the pain in the earlier stages of the condition.However, the pain tends to become rather intense longer term stopping activity. Sufferers of the injury usually notice pain shortly after commencing exercise. Shin splints can often affect both shins too. T…