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Shin Splints - Running Injury Series

Shin Splints are another reasonably common running injury, though the condition does not only affect runners. There are many sports and activities which involve placing a load on the lower legs and which can lead to Shin Splints. As per the name, Shin Splint pain occurs over the shin bone or Tibia area of the lower leg. The diagram below shows a lower left leg, the larger Tibia (shin bone), smaller Fibula and part of the ankle/foot complex.

Images produced with kind permission of 3d4medical.com from Essential Anatomy 5 (Copyright © 2018 3D4Medical. All rights reserved.)
The pain may appear over a small or large area of the shin. The pain can dull in nature, though more often than not is quite sharp. In some cases, people can push through the pain in the earlier stages of the condition.However, the pain tends to become rather intense longer term stopping activity. Sufferers of the injury usually notice pain shortly after commencing exercise. Shin splints can often affect both shins too. T…
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Ankle Injuries (Ankle Inversion and Ankle Eversion) - Running Injury Series

Ankle injuries can undoubtedly be one of the most problematic injuries a runner can get, though such injuries affect a lot of other people too. The simple reason being is that the foot has a significant impact on the “kinetic chain” and everything above the foot/ankle. The foot and ankle are also load bearing joint complexes, with loads increasing with certain types of activity (jumping, fast changes in direction, carrying heavy equipment). Furthermore, ankle injuries affect a wide variety of tissues within the injury area including fascia, ligaments, tendons, muscles. The most severe cases can also lead to joint dislocations and bone breakages Unresolved Ankle injuries can frequently lead to other injuries/conditions such as Plantar Fasciopathy, Achilles Tendinopathy, Shin Splints, Knee, Hip and back problems. Again, this is in part due to the “Kinetic Chain”, and the impact on unresolved ankle injury has on other joints structures and tissues. The author knows much of this all to we…

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS) / Runner’s Knee

Many active and non-active people have no doubt encountered iliotibial Band (ITB) tension, at some point in their life. Excessive, ITB tension can create multiple problems within the “kinetic chain” and in particular the hip, knee and lower back. Another name of ITBS is “Runner’s Knee”, as it frequently affects runners and the knee. However, Patellofemoral Syndrome is also often called “Runner’s Knee”, and the two conditions affect different parts of the knee. Here is a link to the Patellofemoral Syndrome (Runner's Knee, Rower's Knee) article.
Some brief anatomy knowledge, yawn

The ITB is a thick band of “fascia” which runs along the lateral (outside) portion of the thigh to the knee. Fascia is a type of tough connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen fibres, which look like candy floss, cotton wool or spider web silk under magnification. Fascia permeates all tissues within the body and provides many functions including structural and biomechanical. There are also specifi…

Patellofemoral Syndrome / Chondromalacia Patellae or (Runner’s Knee, Rower’s Knee)

The Knee Joint Complex
The knee joint complex is notably one of the most complicated joints structures within the body, with the shoulder joint complex arguably being the most complexed. Knee joints consist of multiple components including, bone, ligaments, tendons, bursae, articular cartilage, menisci, synovial fluid and fascia. Furthermore, there are many muscles with attachments via tendons, which pass over the knee joint complex and are an integral part of overall structure and function. Each of these structures of the knee provides different and in some cases multiple functions. Some typical examples of differing roles include shock absorption (menisci, cartilage), friction reduction (bursae, cartilage), structural stability (ligaments, tendons, muscles, fascia), physical movement (muscles) etc. Furthermore, many of the functions of specific structures are affected by the other structures, for example, muscle function can be changed by the state of the fascia.
Kinetic Chain and Kne…

Stress, the Individual, Wellbeing, Performance and the Workplace (Part Two)

The effects of sustained, long-term "Stress"As a brief recap of the first article “Stress, the Individual, Wellbeing, Performance and the Workplace (Part One)" the author covered:- The physiological and psychological changes that occur as part of the Human “Fight, Flight and Freeze” stress response.Discussed what a “stressors” is and how “perception” of stress plays a huge part in the human stress response. How the stress response instantaneously affects a wide variety of the systems throughout the body, both short and possibly longer term via the release of hormones.That one can divide the Central Nervous System into smaller parts or sub-systems.How the “Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS)” is constantly running at a base-level, even while the “Parasympathetic Nervous System (PSNS)” is operating.The Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) is associated with the “Fight, Flight or Freeze” stress response.That the Parasympathetic Nervous System (PSNS) is associated with “Rest, Diges…

Plantar Fasciopathy (Plantar Fasciitis)

Plantar Fasciopathy (Plantar Fasciitis) is one of the most common sources of heel pain and can often prove debilitating for many patients once symptoms become chronic.  The condition tends to affect middle-aged people, though can easily impact younger and extremely active people, people who spend a lot of time on their feet and people carrying heavy loads. Heavy loads may be due to obesity or can be related to an aspect of work, such as in the military and emergency services. Pain is usually felt on the underside of the foot and near heel area and is commonly sharp and stabbing in nature. As with many conditions with an inflammatory component, symptoms tend to appear worse first thing in the morning or after rest. Typically, the pain seems to improve with walking once one has pushed through the pain. However, symptoms then return and can prove worse after a rest period. One can see the Plantar Fascia area highlighted with a “greenish tint” in the following diagram.

Images produced with…