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Back Pain - A Chiropractor's perspective, causes, treatment

Back Pain - A Chiropractor's perspective, causes, treatment

Back pain is an age-old problem and one which unfortunately most people will experience at some point in life. Episodes of back pain can vary, as can severity and possible cause. The human spine consists of a highly complicated combination of joint structures and soft-tissues. Pain-free and unrestricted mobility relies on each section of the spine, being able to move or function correctly. Overall movement within the spine relies on "coupled-motion", and each section has a direct impact on others within the spinal column. A restriction in one segment will impact segments above and below (see Biotensegrity article), which may or may not result in pain or aching. The article Back Pain - A Chiropractor's perspective explores this in more detail along with possible causes, symptoms and treatment options.


Article written by Dr Terry Davis MChiro, DC, BSc (Hons), Adv. Dip. Rem. Massag.,  Cert. WHS.

TotalMSK Ltd
The Corporate Wellness, Musculoskeletal and Chiropractic Specialists

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