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Patellofemoral Syndrome / Chondromalacia Patellae or (Runner’s Knee, Rower’s Knee)


Knee pain is something that most of the population may experience at some point in life. Such pain may occur after an obvious trauma such as a fall or develop gradually and over time. Equally, people participating in certain types of sports may have a higher incidence of specific types of knee pain, as is often the case with Patellofemoral Syndrome. Patellofemoral Syndrome is also commonly referred to as Runner’s Knee or Rower’s Knee, though even sedentary people can suffer from this type of knee pain. The biomechanics involved in both Running and Rowing both place additional loads on the Patella and knee joint complex. Equally, both of these activities are very repetitive, meaning that tissues and joint structures can quickly become irritated if something is not quite right somewhere in the body. The article about Patellofemoral Syndrome explains more about possible causes, self-help and treatment options.

Article written by Dr Terry Davis MChiro, DC, BSc (Hons), Adv. Dip. Rem. Massag.,  Cert. WHS.

The author possesses an unusual background for a Chiropractor (McTimoney). His education, training and practical experience span over two decades and relate to both physical and mental aspects of health. He has also needed to push his own body and mind to the limits of physical and psychological endurance as part of his time serving in Britain’s elite military forces. His education includes a bachelor of science degree in Business Management, with a specialisation in psychology and mental health in the workplace, an Integrated Masters in Chiropractic, MChiro and a multitude of soft-tissue therapy qualifications. His soft tissue qualifications range from certificate level right through to a BTEC Level 5 Advanced Diploma in Clinical Sports and Remedial Massage Therapy. Terry also has extensive experience in security, work, health and safety and holds relevant certifications. He has also taught at Advanced Diploma level (Myotherapy / Musculoskeletal Therapy) in Australia, both theoretical and practical aspects including advanced Myofascial Release Techniques and has certification in training and assessment. Terry’s combination of knowledge through, education, training, his elite military experience and personal injury history have paid dividends for the patients he sees and has treated. Terry is still extremely active and enjoys distance running, kayaking, mountain biking and endurance-type activities.

TotalMSK Ltd

The Corporate Wellness, Musculoskeletal and Chiropractic Specialists

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